Tag Archives: conflicts of interest

Unfounded opposition to adjudicators invalidated decision

Where one party to an adjudication makes a fraudulent misrepresentation during the appointment process would that invalidate the process of appointment and make the appointment a nullity so that the adjudicator would not have had jurisdiction to act in the adjudication?

In the High Court case of Eurocom Ltd v Siemens Plc [2014] the application form sent to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (“RICS”) seeking the appointment of an adjudicator misrepresented to the RICS that a number of individuals had a conflict of interest.

Eurocom’s agent had admitted that he used the section of the application form allocated to name “adjudicators who would have a conflict of interest in this case” to refer to people without any conflicts of interest who he did not want to be appointed.

So there was a very strong prima facie case that the agent had made a clear misrepresentation and a deliberate and/or reckless false statement and that therefore he had made a fraudulent representation to the RICS as the adjudicator nominating body.

The High Court ruled that where a party applies to an adjudicator nominating body and makes a fraudulent representation then the fraud cancels the advantage which would otherwise have been got from the transaction by voiding the transaction completely.

The false statement had been material. It had been made during a process by which an adjudicator had to be nominated by an impartial adjudicator nominating body and, was improperly made to eliminate candidates based on them having a conflict of interest when actually they had none.

Where there had been a material fraudulent misrepresentation in the process of applying to an adjudication nominating body, the application for a nomination of an adjudicator would be invalid and it would be as if no application had been made.

It did not matter whether the RICS was deceived or not.

The fraudulent misrepresentation would have invalidated the process of appointment and made the actual adjudicator’s appointment a nullity so that the adjudicator would not have had jurisdiction to make the award Eurocom were now seeking to enforce through the courts.

So Siemens had an arguable defence to Eurocom’s claim. That claim must go to a full hearing and Eurocom were denied summary judgement on the claim to enforce the adjudicator’s award.

This case and it’s outcome is a clear warning to anyone who may be minded to use any parts of an application form for their own collateral purposes.

This blog has been posted out of general interest. It does not replace the need to get bespoke legal advice in individual cases.