Tag Archives: Equitable Licences

Right to have and keep gates shut could bind successors

In the Court of Appeal case of Bradley & Anor v Heslin & Anor [2014] what was claimed was a right to maintain gates across the entrance to a joint drive, and a right to open and close those gates at all times and for all purposes connected with the enjoyment of one of the properties, No. 40 Freshfield Road Formby, Merseyside.

The claimant and respondent’s respective predecessors were Mr Thompson and Mr Ewing. Mr Thompson had done work on Mr Ewing’s land including designing and erecting gate pillars and gates, building boundary walls to the driveway, laying out and edging the driveway, planting the hedge and tarmacing the end of the driveway.

The work undertaken considerably exceeded maintenance of the shared portion of the driveway.

There was now a neighbour dispute between their successors as to Mr Thompson’s successors’ rights to close the gates.

Also it was extremely unlikely that Mr Thompson would have done that work on Mr Ewing’s land without any discussion with Mr Ewing, or that Mr Ewing would just stand by and permit it to happen.

Mr Bradley had confirmed orally that Mr Thompson had told him that he had tacitly agreed with Mr Ewing to build the gateposts but there was no direct evidence of any express formal agreement or of any specific terms.

However it could only be inferred that the building of the northern and southern pillars flanking the driveway and the installation of working gates and the other work must have been done with the express agreement of Mr Ewing and that both Mr Thompson and Mr Ewing benefited from the arrangement.

It was evident that the gates had not been not erected with the intention that they be purely ornamental and would never be shut. Mr Thompson had an aggressive dog. One purpose of the gates was to prevent it going onto the road.

It could be inferred that the gates were regularly closed for that reason.

However it could not be inferred that the default position was that the gates were always shut as the dog would probably have been chained or kept in the house as well.

When shut, the gates must have interfered somewhat with Mr Ewing’s freedom to go to and fro.

However there being no evidence of disagreement supported the view that that hindrance was consensual and reasonable.

Doubtless Mr Thompson had constructed the northern gate pillar at his own expense, to his design in his chosen location, and hung from it gates which he operated according to his need. Altogether they contributed to a coherent and unified frontage design which made the entire frontage appear to be part of Mr Thompson’s property.

Mr Thompson had gone far beyond just discharging an obligation to share the cost of maintaining a jointly used driveway. His work and contributions had given Mr Ewing extensive and enduring benefits – even if the agreement had been “tacit”.

Thereafter Mr Thompson acted as an owner of the northern pillar and gates would be expected to act and Mr Ewing did not act as such owner.

Mr Thompson had done so because he reasonably understood that he would be entitled to do so.

That such was the understanding of Mr Thompson must have been known to Mr Ewing who must have intended Mr Thompson to be so entitled in return for all the work that Mr Thompson did at his own expense on property that belonged to Mr Ewing.

If in 1979 Mr Ewing had demolished the northern pillar or painted it pink that would not have been regarded as conscionable. Equity would have estopped Mr Ewing from exercising such rights as registered proprietor of the ground on which Mr Thompson had built the pillar.

If such an estoppel originally governed the relationship between Mr Ewing and Mr Thompson then it continued to bind their successors.

Mr Thompson’s successors could assert rights to ownership of the northern pillar as (assumed) registered proprietors of it. The frontage appeared a unified whole and to be the frontage to No.40. The owners of No.40 were in actual occupation of the pillar so their equitable rights to it were protected as an old overriding interest under the Land Registration Act 1925.

Accordingly, the northern pillar belongs to the Bradleys as owners of No. 40.

As to the ownership of the gates that hung between the pillars, they belonged to the owners of No.40 as well. Mr Thompson had paid for them: and they hung between pillars which belonged to him and had since devolved to his successors as owners of No.40.

When (if ever) may the gates be closed?

It was not intended that the gates should be purely ornamental. Whilst there was no direct evidence of such agreement, the fact that they were used as soon as they were erected evidenced a “tacit” agreement between Mr Ewing and Mr Thompson that the gates were to be functional.

The owner of the property that had the right of way had gated the way and thereby interfered with the landowner’s rights.

If the gates were closed whenever those owners wanted to pass through them, then they would be seriously inconvenienced, as would their predecessors in title have been.

So for the Bradleys to close the gates over the driveway would be a trespass over the Heslins’ land, unless they had a right to do so: which right would be in the nature of an easement. The right to hang and close a gate could be a right capable of being an easement and could be acquired by grant or prescription or as here result from a proprietary estoppel. It was simply the right to occupy airspace by hanging a gate over the land forming a driveway which was quite capable of being an easement that made life better for the property that benefited from it.

It was compatible with being an easement as it did not amount to a claim to the whole beneficial use of the driveway, nor did it render the Heslins’ ownership of the driveway illusory.

This blog has been posted out of general interest. It does not replace the need to get bespoke legal advice in individual cases.